Here And There

Yasutaka Kojima, a talented photographer and friend has work on display in New York at the hpgrp gallery for the next month. The opening reception is tonight, if you are in the area.

Here's the info from the gallery website:



here and there

by three japanese contemporary photographers
February 17 – March 12, 2011
Opening Reception: February 17 2011, 6:00 – 8:00 PM

Photography is a device that absorbs the various appearances of the world as light in a dark box of camera and then restores it to the world again. The trace of the light from the actual world is enclosed in the dark box. They are transformed by the artist's intentions and represented to us as another realities. The images of the altered world inevitably project the past that is similar to an old memory. Thus the photography doesn't have a sense of "Now" that the viewers can share in the duration of the work itself like movie does.

In Motohiro Takeda's 'River' series, the images are continuingly emerging and submerging from the surface of the prints as if they are a fading memory. The photographs of the lost one and the empty house suggest the time of a family life that runs over the generations from long time ago.

Yasutaka Kojima's 'Tokyo' is a documentation of the city in the period of time where our identity and subjectivity has been lost in the urban environment. The city has lost traditional meaning of the perspective structure and collapsed and expanded itself beyond men's intention.

In 'Figure', Yu Kanbayashi photographed the imprints of the cut marks on the ice skate link. The way he perceives the very surface of the subject displays a trace of time that is always passing seamlessly towards evanescence.

Although these three works seem to be very different in terms of the subject matters and the creative processes, each photographer explores the horizon of the medium and its possibility to express their visions of the world that is reconstructed in their own artistic contexts. These photographs in this exhibition manifest the new gaze towards the world, the photographs that are foreseers of the memories that we have not yet seen.

RIVER
Motohiro TAKEDA

"River" is a photographic series taken at my grandparent's family house on the countryside, in Japan, which has been produced as a personal funeral for my late grandfather who past away three years ago. The images are recollection of my own childhood at the house. They have been printed very dark to allude to the way our memory works. When we try to recall something, we try to examine and investigate the fog of our unconsciousness and consciousness. The darkness of my prints is to represent the deep chaos of our minds, the place where our memories are preserved. I had given the work title "River", because in Japan the river is a metaphor for the split between life and death, and also the flow of time, which never stops and runs beyond our life.

Motohiro Takeda
Moving to New York City when he was twenty-one years old, Motohiro Takeda received a BFA on photography from Parsons the New School for Design in 2008. Motohiro was awarded the Tierney Fellowship Grant in 2008, and his work has been exhibited in various venues in New York, including the New York Photo Festival in Brooklyn. He was a selected photographer for Photo España Descubrimientos PHE 2010 and his work is currently a part of the exhibition traveling throughout Spain. He is one of the four recipients of the darkroom residency program in Camera Club New York in 2011

TOKYO
Yasutaka KOJIMA

have been recording cityscape of Tokyo since 2008. The city gives me a sense of evanescence. All the cities are formed by man's lust and the depth of it decides the size of the cities. Every single thing existing in the cities is consisted by man intentionally. The cities transforms themselves every moment like the nature does. I see the future of the cities in the boundary of cities and the nature. I want to record it by photography before it disappears.

Yasutaka Kojima
A New York based Photographer born in Tokyo, Japan. Has been awarded the Japanese Government's fellowship for artists. His works are permanent collection to Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Art, Japan. He was selected for one of the Juna 21 photographers by Nikon in Japan. Exhibited in New York and Tokyo.

FIGURE
Yu KANBAYASHI

This photograph symbolizes the landscape of time through ice itself and scratches on the ice.
What is time? Can we see time? We conceptualize time both subjectively and objectively. My work is an attempt to capture time as represented both in the ice and scratches on its surface. Ice includes time, because water freezes with time.
At the same time, Ice skate rink is like photography – frozen in frames. Photographs show both the present and the past. Scratches on ice also do. We always see the past as the present, the present as the past. We are in-between time.
In this work, the ice themselves and the scratches on ice embody our concept of time. The image presented is landscape of time.

Yu Kanbayashi
Yu Kanbayasshi received a BFA of ART from Tama Art University (Tokyo,Japan) in 2002. His works were selected and exhibited as fine works by Canon New Cosmos of Photography 2003 (Canon & Tokyo Photo Museum ,Japan), by TPCC PRIZE 2003 (Tokyo Photo Culture Center,Japan), and by Tokyo Wander Wall 2009 (Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo,Japan).
Yu worked for Tama Art University as a Research Associate from 2007 to 2010. He curated the exhibitions [Photo of our TIME] 2009 and [126 Polaroid] 2010, and he also edited books of those exhibitions.
October 2010, he moved to New York City as an awarded artist of the Japanese Government's fellowship.


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